Five-star ANYTHING GOES sails into UK cinemas for two nights only!

The multi five-starred new London production of ANYTHING GOES will be screened across the UK for two nights only after the end of its run at London’s Barbican Theatre (until November 6th).

For those of you (like me) who are taking your time to return to theatre, you can see it in more than 450 cinemas across the UK on November 28th and December 1st.

The show had been touted for an extensive UK tour after the London run but this appears to have been shelved owing to scheduling problems and the departure of leading lady Sutton Foster (off to do THE MUSIC MAN on Broadway), after the first delay in opening caused scheduling problems which necessitated the departure of originally announced leading lady Megan Mullaly (of WILL AND GRACE fame).

Scheduling problems for regional tours were thrown into utter chaos by the pandemic causing huge numbers of announcements, sudden cancellations and postponements, which has undoubtedly caused a lot of financial hardship to producers and receiving venues alike. I sincerely hope that the touring schedules are able to be maintained without too much interruption, as our industry- and the theatres they serve- depend upon it.

For cinema tickets to ANYTHING GOES, click here when they go on sale on Friday 15th October.

International screenings are to be announced at a later date.


Join a free conference on Changing Perspectives on Live Performance this Friday and Saturday

Taking place online on Friday and Saturday October 8th/9th from 8.30am to 18.30pm BST, Changing Perspectives on Live Performance: interrogating digital dimensions and new modes of engagement is an intriguing, free two-day conference hosted by Anglia Ruskin University.

The past year has brought changing circumstances to the performance scene. The impossibility of rehearsing and performing to live audiences has forced artists to investigate new alternatives. This has affected both the aesthetics of performance-making and the professional practices of performance-makers. Changes in formats have created new ways of reaching audiences which have more fully exploited an ever-increasing engagement with a wide variety of screen-based technology and digital platforms.

This has significantly transformed live performances which have adapted to new ways of working and resulted in resourceful and imaginative alternatives and variations. Identifying the features of these changes will highlight pioneering directions for the future of live performance. This involves developments in the relationship between dance, theatre and film, offering digital innovations within liveness that this symposium wishes to identify and analyse.

In welcoming presentations, provocations, workshops, and performances as part of the proposals for participating in this symposium, their aim is to identify and analyse the transformations and generate new conversations among artists and theoreticians.

Keynote speakers :

Anne Bogart (theatre director, SITI Company, USA)

Prof Maria Shevtsova (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)

Dr Mark Nicholls (University of Melbourne, Australia)

Wim Vandekeybus (dance theatre director, Ultima Vez, BE)

Roundtable discussion includes:

Charlotte Vincent (choreographer/director, Vincent Dance Theatre, UK)

Workshop by:

Parliament of Practices

The symposium will cover but is not limited to the following themes:

integrating screen-based technology and practices into live performance

blurring the boundaries between the stage and the screen

preserving, enhancing, or degrading the actor’s performance via screen-based technology

delivering virtual performances – platforms and best practice

the role of recording live performances

theatrical adaptations of cinematography

choreographing the camera when recording live performances

streaming performance or recording performance

site-specific as the new theatre

evolving and enduring innovations

theatre developing its own cinematic language

expanding and diminishing theatrical markets

changing patterns in audience engagement and spectatorship

cognitive dimensions of engaging with emerging forms

impact on emerging artists and pathways into production

re-thinking notions of live performance

the digital hiatus altering the experience of live performance

the experience of the liveness in a digital context

digital dramaturgies within live performance

the gendered nature of the impact of digital and technological innovations

definitions of digital theatre

blended and hybrid modes in transmission of meaning


Register for the Conference and find more details here


Hulme Hippodrome celebrates 120th anniversary! plus Update

On October 7th, Manchester’s critically at-risk Hulme Hippodrome celebrated its 120th anniversary with images of its illustrious history are projected onto the building itself, shown to an invited audience of local people. It certainly looks like like everyone had a good time, as well as raising the profile of the beleaguered Hippodrome.

All this and cake too! Who could resist! Happy Birthday to the Hippo and best wishes to all those fighting to save it from greedy developers.

Here’s a couple of photos from the celebration, courtesy of the campaign organisers’ Twitter feed

UPDATE: on 12th October the Campaign Tweeted this – Save Hulme Hippodrome has received legal advice that building is owned by HHM20 Ltd. “We’ve reached out to the owner on numerous occasions & had no response, we’re sending call out to the owner to speak to us & work on a solution now that it can’t be sold for redevelopment.”

“We’re doubling our energy. We are even more determined to succeed. Our intention now is to put as much pressure as we can on the owner and the regulators to get the building back for Hulme and Manchester. It will not survive another winter.”


The National Theatre’s Friday Rush is back!

The Friday Rush has always been a great way to see the National Theatre’s quality drama at affordable prices.

Now the pandemic has allowed the return of live theatre, the news that the Friday Rush is back is a most welcome development.

Offering tickets for most shows (including those showing as Sold Out), you can grab a chance to see a live performance from as little as £10, which is quite a bargain these days!

You can find details of the National Theatre’s Friday Rush Scheme here


Take a short online tour of Leith Theatre!

Here’s a great chance to tour one of Scotland’s at-risk theatres from your own home. Join a LIVE Facebook tour of Leith Theatre.

The Theatre describes the event as follows:

“2020 saw 100 years since Leith became part of the City of Edinburgh; prior to that it was a separate burgh. Since we were not able to open in person during 2020 we are celebrating them this year.

Our talks programme explores the rich heritage of Leith and its unique identity. We were not able to run the talk so instead we are bringing you this short virtual tour of this gem of a theatre.

Leith Theatre was built as a gift to the people of Leith following the amalgamation with Edinburgh in 1920. As well as sharing the theatre’s history and story of how a local action group took on the challenge of saving the building form private development, our speakers will share the journey of getting the venue back on its feet and the doors open, and look to how it’s surviving Covid closure and to the future.

Lynn Morrison leads the tour- she has been in post as Exec Director of Leith Theatre since November 2018. Anna Higham is Funding and Finance Manager at Leith Theatre and has been a key part of the senior management team at the Theatre since August 2017.

Join Lynn on this short tour on Facebook by clicking here