Join a free conference on Changing Perspectives on Live Performance this Friday and Saturday

Taking place online on Friday and Saturday October 8th/9th from 8.30am to 18.30pm BST, Changing Perspectives on Live Performance: interrogating digital dimensions and new modes of engagement is an intriguing, free two-day conference hosted by Anglia Ruskin University.

The past year has brought changing circumstances to the performance scene. The impossibility of rehearsing and performing to live audiences has forced artists to investigate new alternatives. This has affected both the aesthetics of performance-making and the professional practices of performance-makers. Changes in formats have created new ways of reaching audiences which have more fully exploited an ever-increasing engagement with a wide variety of screen-based technology and digital platforms.

This has significantly transformed live performances which have adapted to new ways of working and resulted in resourceful and imaginative alternatives and variations. Identifying the features of these changes will highlight pioneering directions for the future of live performance. This involves developments in the relationship between dance, theatre and film, offering digital innovations within liveness that this symposium wishes to identify and analyse.

In welcoming presentations, provocations, workshops, and performances as part of the proposals for participating in this symposium, their aim is to identify and analyse the transformations and generate new conversations among artists and theoreticians.

Keynote speakers :

Anne Bogart (theatre director, SITI Company, USA)

Prof Maria Shevtsova (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)

Dr Mark Nicholls (University of Melbourne, Australia)

Wim Vandekeybus (dance theatre director, Ultima Vez, BE)

Roundtable discussion includes:

Charlotte Vincent (choreographer/director, Vincent Dance Theatre, UK)

Workshop by:

Parliament of Practices

The symposium will cover but is not limited to the following themes:

integrating screen-based technology and practices into live performance

blurring the boundaries between the stage and the screen

preserving, enhancing, or degrading the actor’s performance via screen-based technology

delivering virtual performances – platforms and best practice

the role of recording live performances

theatrical adaptations of cinematography

choreographing the camera when recording live performances

streaming performance or recording performance

site-specific as the new theatre

evolving and enduring innovations

theatre developing its own cinematic language

expanding and diminishing theatrical markets

changing patterns in audience engagement and spectatorship

cognitive dimensions of engaging with emerging forms

impact on emerging artists and pathways into production

re-thinking notions of live performance

the digital hiatus altering the experience of live performance

the experience of the liveness in a digital context

digital dramaturgies within live performance

the gendered nature of the impact of digital and technological innovations

definitions of digital theatre

blended and hybrid modes in transmission of meaning


Register for the Conference and find more details here


Why Do Historic Places Matter? New report explores the emotional meaning of our heritage

We all know that historic places matter, but this deep dive into the “why”s is useful and exhilarating reading.

Produced by Professor Rebecca Madgin from the Urban Studies Department at the University of Glasgow, this report on emotional attachments to urban heritage is now generally available online, and it’s a great read. The report considers emotional responses, emotional communities and how/why people form attachments to the personalities of historic places.

This report is incredibly useful for any organisation running or aiming to revive a heritage or historic building.

Highly recommended!

Find the report here


Watch Now: New Cultural Conversation focuses on culture’s economic impact

The final discussion in this season hosted by The Lord Mayor of the City of London and the Genesis Foundation is the sixth Cultural Conversation, focusing on the economic value of culture and the arts and it power to aid our ailing economy. The New Future: Art and Culture in the Making of a Vibrant Economy took place online on Monday 20 September, with a live and virtual audience contributing to the Q&A section at the end of the discussion. And what a praiseworthy and interesting talk it was, with great audience interaction in the Q&A too.

The Cultural Conversations series has been a sequence of focused debates around Arts and Culture in the City of London, and are always worth watching. This sixth conversation was chaired by Will Gompertz, in conversation with Alderman William Russell, John Studzinski CBE, our Founder and Chairman, Kully Thiarai, Creative Director, Leeds 2023, Claire McColgan MBE, Director of Culture, Liverpool City Council and Nina Skero, Chief Executive, Centre for Economic and Business Research.

A further series of Cultural Conversations is scheduled for next year.

You can watch the recorded discussion here


Watch Now: Cultural Conversations focuses on the next generations

You can now watch the recording of this fascinating and insigthful discussion.

The Rt Hon The Lord Mayor of the City of London and the Genesis Foundation invited us to join them for the fifth in the series of Cultural Conversations: ‘Young People and The Arts: Making Space and Opening Doors’ which took place online on Monday 26th July.

The Cultural Conversations series is a sequence of focused debates around Arts and Culture in the City of London. This fifth Conversation was chaired by Gemma Cairney, in conversation with Cherry Eckel, Artist and Advisory Group member at Boundless Theatre; Neil Griffiths, Chief Executive at Arts Emergency; Montana Hall, Founder of Run the Check and Trustee at The Photographers Gallery; Renee Odjidja, Curator: Youth Programmes at Whitechapel Gallery; and Abdul Shayek, Artistic Director at Tara Theatre, and Lemn Sissay OBE, Poet, Playwright and Broadcaster.

Please click here to watch the recorded discussion


Not Lost In Translation: Foreign Affairs offers three new online discussions

East-London based theatre group Foreign Affairs describe themselves as “bringing stories from around the globe into unconventional spaces”. Rooted in a collaborative approach, they work with international playwrights and translators to bring award-winning world drama to English-speaking audiences with an eye to exploring topical social and political issues.

To celebrate their 11th anniversary, they have kindly shared three interesting discussions via their YouTube channel. The discussions all concern translations of works, language, perceptions of value and cultural and social issues, as well as the realities of collaborating with playwrights and across cultures.

Discussion One – Are distinctions such as ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ becoming irrelevant in a globalised society?

In this talk, English – Polish literary translator Marta Dziurosz talks to translators Anton Hur, Lúcia Collischonn and Valentina Marconi about “non-native” and collaborative translation, the bias towards/surrounding bilingual translators and the notions of ‘language ownership’ and ‘collaboration vs chaperoning’.

Discussion Two – In this talk, writer, editor and translator Daniel Hahn talks to playwright Marc-Antoine Cyr and his English translator Charis Ainslie, and playwright and translator Caridad Svich about working between cultures and the playwright-translator work relationship.

Discussion Three – In this talk, academic and translator Margherita Laera talks to translators Almiro Andrade and Jeremy Tiang and award-winning playwright Hannah Khalil about the role of translated theatre within an anglophone context, and the underrepresentation and marginalisation of migrant voices and communities on stage.

These conversations last around 75 minutes each and are certainly interesting for their experienced speakers and ideas which are examined.

Please note: These discussions are available online until Monday September 20th.